Volunteering is good for the soul. Here’s why

Volunteering is good for the soul. Here’s why

Plenty of studies exist that show the benefits of volunteering. Whether it’s to pad your resume or for personal satisfaction, volunteering is a mentally and physically good thing to do.

Here’s why volunteering is good for the soul.

Why?

Volunteering is an unpaid position where you’re addressing a social impact you care about and contributing to change. You’re choosing to work without pay and on issues you feel strongly towards. But it’s more than that. It’s been shown to reduce stress, form new relationships, and develop new skills – all while giving back to the community.

Volunteering provides a sense of fulfillment, and it can even advance your career if it’s in the right field. Helping with the smallest task makes all the difference to the people, animals, and organizations who need it.

Mental and physical health

Elevated moods and emotions reflected in volunteering strengthens our immune system and quite literally leaves us feeling better. Helping others through volunteering fosters growth and self-esteem.

This mentally stimulating activity provides a sense of purpose that leaves many feeling better about themselves. Participants connect to others in a new way, which is good for the mind and body. Volunteering is a great mental strategy that gets people involved in the neighborhood, changing the lives of the volunteers and those they help.

People are hardwired to give. Being helpful gives us pleasure and satisfaction, leaving us with a sense of accomplishment. For anyone whose purpose feels unclear, is struggling to find new meaning and direction, and needs a way to take his mind off his own worries, volunteering can help.

Relationships

Volunteers become active community members, meeting others with similar interests and opening themselves up to a broader network. Staying in regular contact with people creates a strong support system around a common cause.

Volunteering is a chance to carry out a purpose and work with those who have similar values.  It helps develop strong relationships with other volunteers, indirectly enforcing your relationship with yourself. Working alongside those who feel passionately about the same cause becomes a mutual bonding point.

Get out and help

Helping others in one way or another is good for the souls of both the volunteer and those who benefit. Why not look at volunteer opportunities in your community and see how you can change yourself and those around you?